FAQs

Clor-N-Oil Questions and Answers

Can Clor-N-Oil be used to determine PCB contamination of used motor/lubricating oil?

No. The Clor-N-Oil PCB field screening kits can only be used to test transformer oil (dielectric fluid). The kits do not work on used motor/lubricating oils because the test method does not specifically identify the presence of PCB. This product detects the CHLORINE associated with the PCB molecule. Mineral oil, the traditional dielectric fluid found in most electrical  equipment, should not contain any background chlorine that could cause false positive results, however, most lubricating oils contain upwards of 200 ppm chlorine from additives and other sources. When testing mineral oil (dielectric fluid), a positive result is presumed to be due to PCB based on chlorine detected in the sample, but laboratory analysis would be required as confirmation. 

What is the shelf life of the Clor-N-Oil kit?

This product is best used within 1 year of the date of manufacture. This "Best-By" date is printed on each kit box. Occasionally, the foil bag in which the kits are sealed, will also display a date. This date should be disregarded, as it does not pertain to the kits inside.

Can Clor-N-Oil kits be used beyond the date printed on the box?

While it is strongly advised that the user adhere to the "Best-By" date printed on the kit box, it may be possible to utilize the product a bit beyond that date. Over time, the indicator reagent in this kit will degrade, increasing the likelihood of false positive results when the "Best-By" date is exceeded.

How should Clor-N-Oil kits be stored?

While this product does not require special refrigeration, it is recommended that they be kept in a cool, dry place to ensure maximum shelf life. It is critical to keep this product out of excessive heat. The kits should never be kept near heating units, or in vehicles during summer months. Heat in excess of 100 degrees Fahrenheit can destroy the chemistry of this product in a matter of days, causing false positive results. If the kits must be kept in vehicles during the summer, they should be kept in in insulated containers with an ice pack.

Can a frozen Clor-N-Oil kit be used?

Freezing does not adversely affect the chemistry of this product, but frozen kits should be allowed to slowly thaw and come to room temperature prior to use. Extreme cold may slow reaction times, necessitating longer wait times between steps to achieve the proper result. 

There are salt crystals around the cap of the test tube and/or on the box. Can this kit be used?

No. This indicates that the clear buffer solution in the tube #2 has leaked. This is often caused by the pressure changes in an airplane cargo hold during shipping. The buffer solution should be approximately 1/2" above the embossed 5 mL line on the test tube. If the tube does not contain the proper volume of buffer solution, contact Dexsil for support. 

Which Clor-N-Oil kit should I use? 20, 50 or 500 ppm?

There are 3 EPA categories for classifying the PCB content of transformer oil:

- Less than 50 ppm = "Non-PCB"

- 50-499 ppm = PCB contaminated

- 500+ ppm = PCB oil/equiptment

In most cases, the Clor-N-Oil 50 would be the starting point for classifying in-use equipment.

What are the potential causes of false positive results on a Clor-N-Oil?

- Presence of any other source of organic or inorganic chlorine (solvents, salt, seawater, sweat).

- The kit is being used beyond the "Best-By" date.

- Sulfur in excess of approximately 1%.

- A sample that is contaminated with bits of carbon from an equipment fire.

- A sample that is excessively hot from equipment that was recently on fire.

- Clor-N-Oil kits are calibrated to Aroclor 1242 . More heavily chlorinated Aroclors, such as 1254 or 1260, may cause  false positive reporting.

What are the potential causes of false negative results on a Clor-N-Oil?

- Water content in excess of approximately 1%.

- Alcohols, acetone, ketones, and acids may also destroy the sodium reagent in the same manner that water does. 

Clor-N-Soil Questions and Answers

What are the possible interferences for the Clor-N-Soil kit?

The Clor-N-Soil  test method determines PCB content by examining chlorine associated with the PCB molecules. Other sources of organic chlorine (solvents, herbicides, pesticides, etc) may cause false positive results. Clor-N-Soil kits are calibrated to Aroclor 1242. More heavily chlorinated Aroclors, such as 1254 or 1260, may cause  false positive reporting.

Will inorganic chloride from road salt or seawater cause an interference?

No. The extraction method of the Clor-N-Soil kit removes any inorganic chloride from the sample. 

Can Clor-N-Soil be used on any type of soil?

Yes, the Clor-N-Soil kits is compatible with the full spectrum of soil types, however, heavy clays will absorb much more extract solvent, making it a bit more difficult to recover the full 5 mL required for analysis. To release more of the liquid from the soil, press down on the soil using the plunger from the syringe assembly, or bounce the tube on a flat surface to compact the soil.

Can Clor-N-Soil be used on soil containing Speedy Dry, wood pulp, or other absorbent material?

No. Any material that is designed to absorb liquids will soak up most, or all, of the extraction solvent, thus making it impossible to recover enough extract liquid for analysis. 

Can Clor-N-Soil be used to test caulk, wood/metal shavings, paint, or concrete?

No. The Clor-N-Soil test method is designed specifically for soil testing. Particle size/surface area, weight, absorbency, and non-PCB organo-chlorine interference are import considerations. Further, the Clor-N-Soil chemistry in not designed to extract PCB from non-soil matrices. 

Does moisture impact the accuracy of the Clor-N-Soil?

The test includes a drying column that removes both moisture and inorganic chloride from the sample, however, the main concern for wet soil is the sample weight. If a significant portion of the sample is water, this could cause an underestimation of PCB content. Samples that are wet should be spread out in a metal pan and allowed to air dry at room temperature prior to weighting out the 10 grams required for the test. 

What is the shelf life of the Clor-N-Soil kit?

This product is best used within 1 year of the date of manufacture. This "Best-By" date is printed on each kit box. Occasionally, the foil bag in which the kits are sealed, will also display a date. This date should be disregarded, as it does not pertain to the kits inside.

Can Clor-N-Soil kits be used beyond the date printed on the box?

While it is strongly advised that the user adhere to the "Best-By" date printed on the kit box, it may be possible to utilize the product a bit beyond that date. Over time, the indicator reagent in this kit will degrade, increasing the likelihood of false positive results when the "Best-By" date is exceeded.

How should Clor-N-Soil kits be stored?

While this product does not require special refrigeration, it is recommended that they be kept in a cool, dry place to ensure maximum shelf life. It is critical to keep this product out of excessive heat. The kits should never be kept near heating units, or in vehicles during summer months. Heat in excess of 100 degrees Fahrenheit can destroy the chemistry of this product in a matter of days, causing false positive results. If the kits must be kept in vehicles during the summer, they should be kept in in insulated containers with an ice pack.

Can a frozen Clor-N-Soil kit be used?

Freezing does not adversely affect the chemistry of this product, but frozen kits should be allowed to slowly thaw and come to room temperature prior to use. Extreme cold may slow reaction times, necessitating longer wait times between steps to achieve the proper result. 

There are salt crystals around the cap of the test tube and/or on the box. Can this kit be used?

No. This indicates that the clear buffer solution has leaked. This is often caused by the pressure changes in an airplane cargo hold during shipping. The buffer solution should be approximately 1/2" above the embossed 5 mL line on the test tube. If the tube does not contain the proper volume of buffer solution, contact Dexsil for support. 

PetroFLAG Questions and Answers

Can I use a prepared calibration standard more than once?

No. The calibration standard only has a life expectancy of 20 minutes, therefore, should be discarded after use.

If the meter is in sample read mode, can I check the calibrations using the 1000 ppm standard?

No. The calibration standard is designed to be used in calibrations mode only. When in sample read mode, it will not read 1000 ppm.

Can I make my own calibration standard?

No. Use only the calibration standard that is provided from Dexsil with each box of reagents.

Will naturally occurring organic compounds interfere with the test?

Yes. Naturally occurring organic compounds will act as a positive interfere on any TPH test. It is advised that the user remove the top layer of soil containing the majority of organic material, prior to taking a sample for testing.

What response factory should I choose when my matrix has multiple contaminants?

Choose the contaminant with the lowest response factor listed, as this will provide the most conservative results.

How important is the 10 minute developing time?

This is very important. The sample should be read after being allowed to develop for 10 minutes, and before 20 minutes has elapsed. Samples that are not allowed to fully develop can not be expected to give accurate results.

Is it important to put the meter cap on when reading a sample?

Yes. The meter cannot read the sample if any outside light is allowed to enter the optical cell. 

Can PetroFLAG be utilized to test water samples for TPH?

No. PetroFLAG utilizes an extraction solvent that is miscible in water, therefore has no extraction capabilities in such a matrix.

Can any type of 9 volt battery be used in the PetroFLAG?

No. Only alkaline 9 volt batteries are compatible with this unit.

Does temperature affect the PetroFLAG?

Yes. Once the meter is calibrated, any change in temperature of 10 degrees Celcius (+/-) or greater, will trigger the meter to prompt re-calibration. Operationally, the instrument should be run with the temperature range of 35-95 degrees Fahrenheit. 

TitraLube TAN and TBN Questions and Answers

What is the difference between the TAN and TBN test kits?

The TitraLube TAN kits are used to determine the oxidation (acid buildup) of lubricating/industrial oils, such as pump oils, hydraulic fluids, turbine oils. The TitraLube TBN kits are designed to measure the reserve alkalinity of lubricating oils used in large diesel engines. 

What do the kit results mean?

The manufacturer or distributor of the oil should be able to provide you with recommendations regarding the useful life of the oil. The kits aid in monitoring the oil condition per the manufacturer’s guidelines.

Can these kits be used to test synthetic oils?

Yes, TitraLube kits are compatible with a wide variety of synthetic lubricants.

Hydroscout System Questions and Answers

Can any type of “9 volt” battery be used?

No. The instrument requires a 9 volt Lithium battery to operate properly.

Can Hydroscout be used to test fuels (i.e. diesel)?

Yes. The Hydroscout can be used to test fuels such as diesel. However, caution should be used when testing gasoline and other very volatile fuels. The reaction between the Hydroscout reagent and the gasoline can cause the plastic test tube to become brittle and break open. Gasoline and other like fuels should be tested using the percent range reagents only.

Can Hydroscout be used to test synthetic oils?

Due to recent improvements in reaction tube strength, Hydroscout is now compatible with a wide variety of synthetic oils, including phosphate esters.

Are there any interferences?

The only known positive interference is ethylene glycol. (Propylene glycol does not interfere with the test.) 

Can the meter be used to determine the presence of oil in water?

No.